Mark Kainz

  Mark Kainz

 

Education

  • 1978 B.S., University of Portland, Portland, Ore. (biology)
  • 1980 M.S., Washington State University, Pullman, Wash. (plant pathology)
  • 1994 Ph.D., Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y. (biochemistry, molecular and cell biology
  • 1994-1997, postdoctoral fellow (bacteriology), University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • 1997-1999, postdoctoral scientist (plant virology), University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Current Courses Taught

  • Biology 121 Introductory Biology
  • Biology 200 Scientific Writing & Communication
  • Biology 219 Genetics
  • Biology 300 Departmental Studies: Virology
  • Biology 314 Microbiology
  • Biology 328 Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics
  • Biology 501, 502 Senior Studies

 

 

 

 

Recent Publications

  • Kainz, M., Hilson, P., L. Sweeney*, E, DeRose* and T. German (2004) Interaction between Tomato spotted wilt virus N protein monomers involves non-electrostatic forces governed by multiple distinct regions in the primary structure. “Phytopathology” 94:759-765.

* undergraduate students

  • Kainz, M. and R. Gourse (1998) The C-terminal domain of the alpha subunit ofEscherichia coli is required for efficient rho-dependent transcription termination. “Journal of Molecular Biology” 284:1379-1390.
  • Savery, N., G. Lloyd, M. Kainz, T. Gaal, W. Ross, R. Ebright, R. Gourse and S. Busby (1998) Transcription activation at class II CRP-dependent promoters: identification of determinants in the c-terminal domain of the RNA polymerasea subunit. “EMBO Journal” 17:3439-3447.
  • van Uhlsen, P., M. Hillebrand, M. Kainz, R. Collard, L. Zulianello, P. van de Putte, R. Gourse and N. Goosen (1997) Function of the C-terminal domain of the alpha subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase in basal expression and integration host factor-mediated activation of the early promoter of bacteriophage Mu. “Journal of Bacteriology” 179:530-537.
  • Kainz, M. and J.W.Roberts (1995) Kinetics of RNA polymerase initiation and pausing at the lambda late gene promoter. “Journal of Molecular Biology”254:808-814.
  • Kainz, M. and J.W.Roberts (1992) Structure of transcription elongation complexes in vivo. “Science” 255:838-841.
  • Guo, H.C., M. Kainz, and J.W. Roberts (1991) Characterization of the late-gene regulatory region of phage 21. “Journal of Bacteriology” 173:1554-1560.
  • Gross, M.K., M. Kainz, and G.F. Merrill (1987) The chicken thymidine kinase gene is transcriptionally repressed during terminal differentiation; the associated decline in tk mRNA cannot fully account for the disappearance of tk enzyme activity. “Developmental Biology” 122:439-451.
  • Gross, M.K., M. Kainz, and G.F. Merrill (1987) Introns are inconsequential to efficient formation of cellular thymidine kinase mRNA in mouse L cells. “Molecular & Cellular Biology” 7:4576-4581.

 Recent Presentations

  • Kainz, M. (2010) Tomato spotted wilt virus N protein binds sequences from the 5’ terminus of viral genomic RNA with high affinity. American Society for Microbiology North Central Branch Meeting, Mankato, Minn.
  • Kainz, M. (2010) Driving nails with a wrench, how viruses hijack host cell proteins to replicate. Wisconsin Science Consortium Annual Meeting, Fond du Lac, Wis.
  • Martinez, E.* and M. Kainz (2009) Role of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus NSs gene in Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus virulence. American Society for Microbiology North Central Branch Meeting, La Crosse, Wis.
  • Rico, A.* and M. Kainz (2009) Identification of amino acid residues involved in Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus N protein interactions. American Society for Microbiology North Central Branch Meeting, La Crosse, Wis.
  • Kainz, M. and B. Hoopes (2009) Identification of candidate Arabidopsis thaliana proteins involved in the replication cycle of Tomato spotted wilt virus.American Society for Microbiology meeting, Philadelphia, Pa.
  • Kainz, M. and K. Dolan* (2007) Sequences in the Tomato spotted wilt virusgenomic RNA that interact with viral N protein with high specificity reside in the 5’ terminal 250 nucleotides. American Society for Virology Meeting, Corvallis, Ore.

* undergraduate students

  • Thompson, A, M. Kainz, and T. German (2005) Expression of tomato spotted wilt virus RNA and nucleocapsid proteins in yeast from cDNA clones. VIII International Symposium on Thysanoptera and Tospoviruses. Asilomar, Calif.
  • Kainz, M,  A. Thompson, , and T. German (2004) Virus-specific gene silencing occurs in both plants and insects infected with tomato spotted wilt virus. American Society for Virology Meeting, Montreal, Canada.
  • Kainz, M., Hilson, P., L. Sweeney*, E, DeRose*, and T. German (2003) Dimerization and multimerization of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) N protein involves multiple distinct regions in the primary structure. American Society for Virology Meeting, Davis, Calif.
  • Kainz, M and R. Gourse (1999) The C-terminal domain of the alpha subunit ofEscherichia coli is required for efficient rho-dependent transcription termination. Biological Sciences Symposium, SUNY-Binghamton, Binghamton, N.Y.
  • Kainz, M and R. Gourse (1996) The c-terminal domain of the alpha subunit ofEscherichia coli RNA polymerase is required for efficient rho-dependent transcription termination. American Society for Microbiology Meeting, New Orleans, La.
  • Kainz, M and J. Roberts (1994) Transcription complexes modified by the phage lambda Q protein occlude the phage late promoter. Molecular Genetics of Bacteria and Phage Meeting, Madison, Wis.
  • Kainz, M and J. Roberts (1992) Long-range effects of Q-dependent transcription on DNA structure. Molecular Genetics of Bacteria and Phage Meeting, Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.
  • Kainz, M and J. Roberts (1990) Nontranscribed regions determine the specificity of Q protein-qut site interactions in vivo. Molecular Genetics of Bacteria and Phage Meeting, Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.
  • Kainz, M and J. Roberts (1989) Analysis of transcriptional pausing in vivo in the phage lambda qut site. Molecular Genetics of Bacteria and Phage Meeting, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, N.Y.
  • Kainz, M and J. Hendrix (1981) Response of cereal roots to barley yellow dwarf virus infection in a mist culture system. American Phytopathological Society Meeting, St Paul, Minn.

 

 

Areas of Interest

  • Replication strategies of plant-infecting viruses
  • Host-pathogen interactions
  • Regulation and mechanisms of transcription in prokaryotes