Lamont Colucci publishes wide-ranging opinion pieces

Associate Professor of Politics and Government Lamont Colucci has had several online opinion pieces published recently in The Hill, U.S. News, The Washington Times and AMI Newswire.

In an article published to U.S. News on Dec. 4, Colucci calls attention to the Burmese government’s treatment of a minority group known as the Rohingya. The Rohingya have been victims of mass killing, theft, arson and other atrocities at the hands of the Burmese government. He calls for America to intervene, writing, “There is always an easy test for American foreign policy: If one can maximize international relations realism and liberalism, aka democratic realism, one can be assured it is a good policy. Championing the Rohingya fits this completely.”

In a Dec. 12 feature published to the Washington Times, Colucci criticizes the prevalence of Star Wars merchandise showcasing the villains. “This is a disturbing trend whose roots run far deeper than movie criticism,” he writes. He calls for audiences to self-examine their fascination with the Dark Side. “One does not need to lapse into hysteria to raise these concerns, nor is there any solution that could or should be mandated by government or the entertainment industry. However, that should not stop those who prefer the virtues of the Force to the dark side from asking Americans to reflect on the effects of their silver screen infatuation.”

On Dec. 24, he published a piece to The Hill discussing President Trump’s national security strategy. “It is still far too early to talk about a ‘Trump Doctrine,’” he states. “Those take time to form and are an amalgam of rhetoric, policy, practice, and institutional commitment. But we now have a window into what that might look like.

“Like the Bush doctrine, the Trump NSS puts fourth four pillars: to protect the American people, the homeland, and the American way of life; to promote American prosperity; to preserve peace through strength; and to advance American influence. It seeks to further American interests and values.”

On AMI Newswire on Dec. 27, Colucci reacted to Politico’s report about the Obama administration’s protection of a terrorist group known as Hezbollah. The administration reportedly blocked efforts to stop the group’s drug smuggling in order to preserve the Iranian nuclear agreement, delaying the country’s nuclear energy program. Colucci critiques the ethics of this decision and examines the ways in which it threatened national security.

In two pieces on U.S. News Jan. 3 and Jan. 16, Colucci discussed China’s potential militarization of Qatar, and speculates on China’s motives; and examines Russia’s attempts to gain influence in the Middle East. He discusses a deal between Russian and Egypt, an arrangement that lets Russian military planes use Egyptian airspace and facilities. “Diplomatically, this continues Russia’s bid to reassert its worldwide presence and prestige,” he writes.

On AMI Newswire on Jan. 22, he voices concern about those who left their home countries to fight for the terrorist organization ISIS and now are returning to their home countries. “For the United States, the return of foreign fighters will revive debate surrounding enemy combatants and battlefield detainees — as well as the utility of Guantanamo as a prison for terrorists,” he writes. “As ISIS terrorists return to their nation of origin, it is unlikely that they will not foment violence and radicalization.”